Savannah Cat Chat - THE Place for Savannah Cat Talk

Welcome to the Savannah Cat Chat Forum! Our forum has been in existence since 2012 and is the only one of its kind. We were here, serving the savannah cat community before Facebook and Instagram! Register for a free account today to become a member! Please use an email program other than Hotmail, since Hotmail accounts are blacklisted by many servers and ISP's. Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site in some of the forums by adding your own topics and posts. But in order to take advantage of the full features, such as a private inbox as well as connect with other members ad access some of the larger topics, a donation of $2.99/mo or $25/yr is requested. This will allow us to continue running this forum!

AVMA takes action against raw food feeding

D

Dantes

Guest
#1
Just saw this: http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articles/very-bad-news-for-raw-feeders.html

'She shared that at an upcoming meeting (August 2 or 3, 2012) the AVMA Council on Public Health and Regulatory Veterinary Medicine will vote to create a policy to "discourage the feeding to cats and dogs of any animal source protein that has not first been subjected to a process to eliminate pathogens because of the risk of illness to cats and dogs as well as humans." '

 
D

Dantes

Guest
#3
Not until we are a true police state with policemen on every corner, watching who and what goes in and out of your house. Kinda like Cuba.
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#4
yes, you are right...I have seen the houses on every block in Cuba, that report on the block activities to the Cuban govt...sort of like HSUS, offering $5000 to anyone reporting a dog breeder...it is a very sad time in our country's history.
 
D

Dantes

Guest
#7
lol each neighborhood has what's called a CDR, or Committee for the Defence of the Revolution, made up of people from the neighborhood. If one of the neighbors does something reportable, which could be just about anything, they report it, the offending neighbor is punished (sometimes even if they aren't guilty), and the neighbor who did the reporting gets a commendation. This is on top of the police that stand on the street corners holding machine guns, and bring people to the police station for offences such as "walking with a foreigner." And of course there are fines involved.

Time for Costa Rica lololol
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#8
lol each neighborhood has what's called a CDR, or Committee for the Defence of the Revolution, made up of people from the neighborhood. If one of the neighbors does something reportable, which could be just about anything, they report it, the offending neighbor is punished (sometimes even if they aren't guilty), and the neighbor who did the reporting gets a commendation. This is on top of the police that stand on the street corners holding machine guns, and bring people to the police station for offences such as "walking with a foreigner." And of course there are fines involved.

Time for Costa Rica lololol
Yes, I have seen it all in person...long story...
 
D

Dantes

Guest
#9
Despite plenty of consumer outrage and veterinary disagreement with the AVMA's policy, it looks like it has passed.

Since there isn't a ton of info yet (it just happened yesterday), here's yet another well-written argument against it that the AVMA seems to have disregarded.

http://www.examiner.com/article/a-review-of-the-avma-s-proposed-policy-against-raw-food
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has been encouraged by the Delta Society and the Council on Public Health and Regulatory Veterinary Medicine (CPHRVM) to make a policy statement concerning the public health risk of feeding pets raw food diets. The following is a summary of an objective review regarding the AVMA pending policy.
This review was not commissioned by any organization, or affiliate of an organization, that makes or sells pet food (either raw or commercially processed).
-----------------
Regarding the AVMA Policy on Raw or Undercooked Animal-Source Protein in Cat and Dog Diets (by James K. Russell, Ph. D.)
The executive board of the American Veterinary Medical Association has recently proposed a policy statement on the provision of raw and undercooked diets to cats and dogs. Publication of the policy is pending general approval by the association.
The policy is generally sensible, but risks being misconstrued. Further, while it cites a number of scientific studies, they are of mixed quality and none fully settle the principal concern addressed by the policy—the safety regarding raw meat ingredients for consumption in companion animals and for food handlers (typically their owners). In response to public concern, the association explains that it is not in a position to effect a ban, not having any governmental authority. Nonetheless, policies of non-profit professional societies can be highly influential. In the medical community, it is understood that this influence is consequential, and expected that the process behind policy development be transparent. It cannot be ignored that the prepared dog food industry, with over $10 billion in annual revenues, has a stake in policies potentially affecting the prevalence of alternative diets. It does not seem too much to ask that any potential conflict of interest on the part of the authors with respect to the industry should be disclosed.
Here is the policy, in short:
  • Never feed inadequately treated animal-source protein to cats and dogs
  • Restrict cats' and dogs' access to carrion and animal carcasses (e.g. while hunting)
  • Provide fresh, clean, nutritionally balanced and complete commercially prepared or home-cooked food to cats and dogs, and dispose of uneaten food at least daily
  • Practice personal hygiene (e.g. handwashing) before and after feeding cats and dogs, providing treats, cleaning pet dishes, and disposing of uneaten food
Of course practicing good hygiene with our pets makes good sense, as does the provision of clean, nutritious food and the disposal of uneaten food. Access to carcasses is not a major issue for most pet owners. Given the topic of the policy, and its position, most attention will focus on the first statement:
"Never feed inadequately treated animal-source protein to cats and dogs".
Depending on how it is interpreted, this statement is at best unclear, and under a broad interpretation goes beyond the available evidence. Read most straightforwardly, it amounts to a recommendation to never feed raw meat and eggs to our carnivore pets. Such a recommendation is not well supported by the evidence. An alternative reading would permit raw meats and eggs that were "adequately treated". Whether adequate treatment is consistent with maintenance of food in a raw condition is unclear, and the policy does not speak to this point. Certainly, it is established human practice to carefully treat raw animal protein safely while retaining its rawness - this is true for instance of sushi, sashimi and steak tartare, not to mention salad. And, it is recognized that particular care is required when preparing raw foods for human consumption because of the heightened risk of bacterial contamination. Cooking is an easy and reliable method for protecting against bacterial contamination; however, it is not the only effective method.
Few of the studies cited in support of the policy include controls and several are little more than anecdotal. Most of the studies advocate good hygienic practices when preparing raw meat meals, as do statements from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service, from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A representative list of optimal hygienic measures would include[ii],[iii],[iv],[v],[vi]:
  • use of only meats inspected (e.g. by USDA) and found suitable for human consumption
  • hand washing after handling raw foods
  • regular washing or disinfection with a mild bleach solution of bowls, food preparation surfaces and implements
  • avoidance of cross-contamination by use of separate preparation surfaces for separate ingredients
  • proper storage of raw ingredients in the refrigerator or, for extended periods, the freezer
  • disposal of unconsumed meal portions
  • avoidance of exposure of young children, the elderly or the ill to raw food ingredients