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Broken Hip, Orthopedic Surgery Tomorrow

John Popp

Site Supporter
#1
Well, I finally get my introduction in and within 12 hours I need some real help.

Chongo broke his hip last night when he pulled an ornate cast iron fireplace screen over on himself. I was pretty good about checking out the details on what to should be done with his anesthesia for his neuter, although now we are in a whole new ballpark for what needs to be done.
While I'm sure the orthopedic surgeon is up to speed with things, it's more for my comfort knowing that I can provide them with some straight forward details on Savannah care when going under the knife.

Some words of encouragement would be helpful as well from people who have had similar procedures done to their pet. My wife and I can hardly keep the tears from our eyes despite knowing that are little guy is going to be OK.

Thanks in advance for your replies!

Pelvis VD.jpg
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#2
Wow, John, I am so sorry! I do not have any experience with ortho surgery, although I do have experience with Sv cat abdominal surgery...I'm guessing anesthesia is the most important aspect. have you asked what type of anesthesia will be administered?

I'm sure Chongo will be fine...kittens are most resilient...
 

John Popp

Site Supporter
#4
I haven't had the opportunity to speak with the surgeon yet and won't get to speak to them until tomorrow morning. Our little window of knowledge comes from the breeder who simply recommends using isoflurane gas and a very small amount of injectable anesthesia to relax the kitten/cat to prepare them for the gas anesthesia.

Thanks for your concern and the words of encouragement!
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#5
I'm guessing they will use what they usually use...we have differing opinions here on anesthesia...

I'm guessing you will have to keep the kitten still for a number of weeks...and I would ask about pain meds...
 

John Popp

Site Supporter
#6
Thanks Paige!

We always defer to the specialist, and only ask that they hear what we have to say. Notes of caution seem to be what's in order and I certainly wouldn't want to push the surgeon out of their comfort zone.

We did select a hospital that has 4 staff orthopedic surgeons/neurologists. Our Surgeon specializes in small animals (not small for a kitten) as the same name came up from our vet, the emergency clinic and two friends also in the field. I feel as comfortable about where Chongo will get his care as I could be, and one of two places in the state of Ohio that specialize in the care he will need.

Sorry for the delay in responding, I've been working on building a recovery cage that it's going to break my heart to put him into.
 

SV Dad

Savannah Super Cat
#8
For some encouragement, at the barn where my wife's horse was boarded, a cat got kicked by a horse and broke it's hip. My wife took the cat to the vet, and the hip needed to be set, which was done. The cat was convalesced in a large cage to limit his movement for 5 weeks or so. After this, my mother in law took in this cat, which lived a full and healthy life. This was 25 years ago, and I am sure veterinary surgery has improved in the intervening years. Things should be fine for Chongo in the long run.
 
#9
Thanks Paige!

We always defer to the specialist, and only ask that they hear what we have to say. Notes of caution seem to be what's in order and I certainly wouldn't want to push the surgeon out of their comfort zone.

We did select a hospital that has 4 staff orthopedic surgeons/neurologists. Our Surgeon specializes in small animals (not small for a kitten) as the same name came up from our vet, the emergency clinic and two friends also in the field. I feel as comfortable about where Chongo will get his care as I could be, and one of two places in the state of Ohio that specialize in the care he will need.

Sorry for the delay in responding, I've been working on building a recovery cage that it's going to break my heart to put him into.
You are wise to have orthopedic surgeons. Poor Chongo. I agree with those who have said the recovery is going to be the hard part. Once he starts feeling better, he'll want to be active, that will be your challenge.
 

John Popp

Site Supporter
#10
Just back from seeing Chongo at the Vet's office. He is a real trooper and head butted me on the chin hard enough to rattle my teeth loose. He was all too happy to see Trish and I, purring the whole time we were there. Unfortunately we had to cut our visit short as he was ready to get in all out play mode, which is why he didn't come home with us for the evening.

We are more and more convinced he is going to pull through all of this just fine. As Kristine mentioned, the biggest challenge will be keep him mellow enough to heal properly.

Thanks again for the words encouragement, I'm feeling a thousand times better than when I saw the X-ray.