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Cat,Bat in house

Sean

Site Supporter
#1
So how much rish from a bat that got into the house? I think it got in from the
fireplace. The cats must of knocked the glass door open trying to get at it.
The bat was not acting strange at all and was easy to catch once the cats
were all out of the room. They ran it till it was tired. Paper grocery bags sure come
in handy. The plastic ones would not of worked. Bat is in the bad in a large plastic
tub with the lid on. I called the wildlife person that covers this area but no call back
yet but was at 1AM and some people do get to sleep.
The problem is Bella is the one that has not had a rabies vaccination shot yet.
Both the boys are good other than Mokkun is do for his everything else booster.

ANY thoughts?

I do now know why they were acting so freaky the last few days if the bat was in the fireplace.

Sean
 

Tort518

Savannah Super Cat
#4
I had a bat in my apartment about 9 years ago. I had to call around till I could find someone to come handle it, pay them, then get reimbursed by the rental company. They couldn't find it so the maintainence crew came in the next day, trapped it and released it on a tree outside.

Regarding your unvaxinated cat, I recommend calling your vet to get advice.
 

Sean

Site Supporter
#6
Oh wow, The cats want the new play thing back. They keep looking to the fireplace for the "Toy".
I think I should have the fireplace inspected for more "Toys" I don't mind bats so long as they stay
in the places where they should be and not in my house. After all they do eat some other pests.

Sean
 

Pam Flachs

Savannah Super Cat
#7
So how much rish from a bat that got into the house? I think it got in from the
fireplace. The cats must of knocked the glass door open trying to get at it.
The bat was not acting strange at all and was easy to catch once the cats
were all out of the room. They ran it till it was tired. Paper grocery bags sure come
in handy. The plastic ones would not of worked. Bat is in the bad in a large plastic
tub with the lid on. I called the wildlife person that covers this area but no call back
yet but was at 1AM and some people do get to sleep.
The problem is Bella is the one that has not had a rabies vaccination shot yet.
Both the boys are good other than Mokkun is do for his everything else booster.

ANY thoughts?

I do now know why they were acting so freaky the last few days if the bat was in the fireplace.

Sean


Sean, the risk of your cats being bit by a rabid bat are low. I live in a very old house, that before it was remodeled outside top to bottom (new roof, windows, siding, chimney cover, etc) meant that bats were a frequent visitor. I knew that the county I lived in for a few years had the highest incidence of rabies in bats for our state, so I make sure all of our cats have a rabies vaccine. Cats will catch and eat bats, or at the very least, use them for a play thing, like your cats did. We were always able to either catch the bats in our house to release away from the house or shoo them outdoors (put cats in another room first) before they could be batted down and eaten or played with.

The easiest way to remove a bat that is flying in your house is to watch its flight pattern. Using their sonar, they will make a series of swoops in each room as they try to find an exit. If at all possible, try to contain them to one room, and have an open outside door and generally they will fly out. You can use a broom or badminton bat to encourage them towards the door. We have even found bats just clinging to the wall quietly, and have a homemade "bat scoop" to capture them that way. Our scoop is a 4" wide, three foot length of PVC pipe duct taped on one end, and a large metal coffee can with a lid to put the bat in once scooped inside the pipe from the wall. They don't attempt to fly out, and are easily dumped into the coffee can. We would then take the can outdoors and release them away from our house, as we know how very valuable bats are for insect control, and their numbers are in decline.

We have not had a bat in our house since our remodel six years ago, but the bat scoop and coffee can are still within easy reach, just in case.

If you are sure the bat got in through the fireplace (likely), make sure there is a critter proof cover or vent over the chimney that will keep out squirrels and birds, too.

Try to contact your local DNR office for advice on testing it. Here is a link to the CDC's website, and you might want to check your state's stats on rabies incidence in bats. http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/

If you still have the bat, and it is dead, put it in a ziplock bag and into the freezer if you are going to have it tested.

While the risks are low of you or your pets being bit by a rabid bat or other creature, it does happen. We know of a man who died of rabies about 4 years ago that lived 50 miles north of us. In that case, he was bitten by a rabid raccoon he was trying to release from a trap, and waited too long to seek medical help.
If I were you, since you have found a bat in your house, and now know they can get in, get Bella her rabies vaccine asap and bat-proof your home. Bats are able to get in through the smallest opening that is at least an inch in diameter. You can use tightly packed steel wool or a foam sealant to fill any cracks in the chimney or foundation, as well as making sure your chimney has a cover to keep them out. Be sure to check your windows, too for any loose screens or holes they might squeeze through.
 
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