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Claw Trimming

L

Louie'sDad

Guest
As Louie grows older he's becoming more and more ornery during claw trimming time. He's now at the point where he draws my blood via a bite or a mean gash from a scratch. My vet refuses to trim his claws and is visibly afraid of him. The local pet store groomer I sometimes use to help me, still leaves me bleeding afterwords. In a word, I have now finally abandoned any hope of performing this chore with Lou's cooperation. I have tried sedatives, and they do not work at all.

Has anyone here had luck with a restraining device, such as a cat bag, or similar. I will need to supplement with a hood/muzzle. I need suggestions on which are the most durable and RELATIVELY easy to get the cat into.

I realize that this might offend some people here. My wish was to have Lou enjoy, not dread this experience and I have tried since he was very young, to get him to accept the nail trim. I thought I was almost there at one point, but after he passed 1 YO, he took a definite turn against the procedure. Apparently, restraint is the last resort. I understand that the hood might, in some cases make the ordeal less stressful because he won't be able to see.
 

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
You always take the chance of escalating his dislike of the procedure with each trick you try. Why not just let it go? He'll take care of his own claws. You can try tacking strips of very fine grit sand paper to his scratching posts or cat tree and see if he uses it.
 

Carykd7kau

Reincarnated cat Moderator
Deb, I had a yellow tabby girl a few years back and if I did not keep her claws trimmed, they would grow and curl back and grow into her toes. She lost 3 toes on her front feet because of that. So I recommend at least checking them monthly to make sure they are not ingrowing. I felt like such a terrible person when I found out I had let them go that long.
 

Brigitte Cowell

Moderator
Staff member
I have had a cat like that, Katie, and when they are large and muscular it is very hard to restrain them safely... a muzzle is a good idea to prevent bites, and wrapping in a towel is often the best way to go about it. It's a two person job when a cat is that averse to it. Often the muzzle covering the eyes calms the cat in addition to protecting you from teeth. Unfortunately all the patience and soft techniques can fail with a small proportion of cats...and it seems that Louie is one of those cats :-(

We didn't have much success with a cat bag... I had a cat get so upset about being in the bag she pooped and struggled and it was not pretty...never again!
 

Chris Elliott

Savannah Super Cat
Looks like you started two threads on the same subject, one here in Questions, and another in Behavior, which only I have responded to. I'll repost my comment here. Then the other thread can be deleted.
 

Chris Elliott

Savannah Super Cat
Many cats can be peacefully restrained using the same technique used by mother cats when moving their babies.

Basically, by applying the same pressure as a mother cat would, or if there was a large enough mother cat to carry your grown cat, many (60-80%) of cats can be put into a state that you can do most anything to them.

Here's an article on what they are calling "Clipnosis":

http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/vetmed/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/650761

This article referenced Ohio State U.'s studies and papers on this way of restraining cats.

Many vet techs will do this manually. However, this almost always means it takes two people.

You can use a clip or two, and the effect is almost as effective as the technician's grip. You can use 2" binder clips--you'll need at least two--maybe even three. Read the study--they show that this pressure does not hurt or bruise the cat. If it works, you can buy clips especially designed at:

http://www.ourpets.com

Please note that you must start with a calm cat and get the clips on without unduly disturbing the calm. Then just be careful to keep calm and avoid loud noises that might bring the cat out of this state.

Some cats almost become catatonic--almost. Others just become much easier to handle. And some it doesn't work on at all.

I am just a happy user of this technique. It works on my mongrel cat and my F6 Savannah female. Haven't tried it on my F2 yet--only had him a month, and I'm on a road trip, otherwise I'd try it now.

I hope this helps.
 
L

Louie'sDad

Guest
Many cats can be peacefully restrained using the same technique used by mother cats when moving their babies.

Basically, by applying the same pressure as a mother cat would, or if there was a large enough mother cat to carry your grown cat, many (60-80%) of cats can be put into a state that you can do most anything to them.

Here's an article on what they are calling "Clipnosis":

http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/vetmed/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/650761

This article referenced Ohio State U.'s studies and papers on this way of restraining cats.

Many vet techs will do this manually. However, this almost always means it takes two people.

You can use a clip or two, and the effect is almost as effective as the technician's grip. You can use 2" binder clips--you'll need at least two--maybe even three. Read the study--they show that this pressure does not hurt or bruise the cat. If it works, you can buy clips especially designed at:

http://www.ourpets.com

Please note that you must start with a calm cat and get the clips on without unduly disturbing the calm. Then just be careful to keep calm and avoid loud noises that might bring the cat out of this state.

Some cats almost become catatonic--almost. Others just become much easier to handle. And some it doesn't work on at all.

I am just a happy user of this technique. It works on my mongrel cat and my F6 Savannah female. Haven't tried it on my F2 yet--only had him a month, and I'm on a road trip, otherwise I'd try it now.

I hope this helps.

It was tried and failed. But thanks fer chiming in.
 
L

Louie'sDad

Guest
I have had a cat like that, Katie, and when they are large and muscular it is very hard to restrain them safely... a muzzle is a good idea to prevent bites, and wrapping in a towel is often the best way to go about it. It's a two person job when a cat is that averse to it. Often the muzzle covering the eyes calms the cat in addition to protecting you from teeth. Unfortunately all the patience and soft techniques can fail with a small proportion of cats...and it seems that Louie is one of those cats :-(

We didn't have much success with a cat bag... I had a cat get so upset about being in the bag she pooped and struggled and it was not pretty...never again!


Happy for the confirmation that blinding/muzzling has a calming effect. You do remember when I posted previously about the tranquilizer? Well......it had no effect.

I'll try the hood/muzzle first with a towel instead of the bag.

Immediately after I have trimmed his claws in the past, he straightaway begins pulling on them to remove the outer shells. He uncannily knows how to accelerate the shedding/sharpening process for his claws!
 
L

Louie'sDad

Guest
You always take the chance of escalating his dislike of the procedure with each trick you try. Why not just let it go? He'll take care of his own claws. You can try tacking strips of very fine grit sand paper to his scratching posts or cat tree and see if he uses it.

Like you, I'd give it a go NEVER to trim his claws; however, thank Lady Luck, Louie doesn't have a scratching post, nor does he, SO FAR need one. He does little to no damage to my home and furnishings with his claws!

He is much more oral (doglike) in his behavior. He'd much prefer to chew stuff than to scratch stuff.
 
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