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Declawing cats

Per Lausund

Moderator
Staff member
#1
Declawing cats, or rather: amputating the outer part of the toes to remove the nail, is sometimes done, and with varying degrees of unsuccessfulness. Sometimes you get biting instead, sometimes inappropriate urination, or just a scared cat which has lost its main defence.
I would like to see views on this subject, as it seems to pop up ever so often!
 

Medesha

Savannah Super Cat
#2
Well, I really don't think people should get it done on their cats at all: I feel like most people do it just because they don't want he cat to claw up their furniture.

If you place the condition of your furniture over a living thing, maybe you shouldn't have a pet. And besides that, there are tons of scrAtching posts when placed properly and when the cat has the right incentive, then the cat won't be inclined to use your things.

A friend of mine got her cat declawed because they were worried about him scratching her then infant sister- I understand the fear there, it seems like a more legitimate reason than the above, but you're never supposed to leave small children around animals anywAy, no matter the pet or how sweet or patient the pet is, because kids sometimes don't understand how to treat animals until they are older.

I've heard of some other people saying that they'd use it as a last resort, if the cat was attacking them or their other pets, but it has always seemed to me that, the scratching Is a symptom of something else, maybe an illness or dysfunction or pet/human/living situational incompatibility. Removing the cats claws in a situation like that would only stop the cat from showing what's wrong in one way and they might try in another. In a situation like that, I would prefer to rehome a cat rather than remove its claws.

I hear in most other places, cat declawing isn't allowed, which is great and a sad look at the state of affairs in the US. At the end of the day I feel like there are so many other options to consider (scratching posts, slow reintroduction, soft claws, rehoming) that declawing shouldn't be an option and certainly it shouldn't be as routine and the first thing people get done when trouble starts.
 

jungle boy

Savannah Super Cat
#3
Well, I really don't think people should get it done on their cats at all: I feel like most people do it just because they don't want he cat to claw up their furniture.

If you place the condition of your furniture over a living thing, maybe you shouldn't have a pet. And besides that, there are tons of scrAtching posts when placed properly and when the cat has the right incentive, then the cat won't be inclined to use your things.

A friend of mine got her cat declawed because they were worried about him scratching her then infant sister- I understand the fear there, it seems like a more legitimate reason than the above, but you're never supposed to leave small children around animals anywAy, no matter the pet or how sweet or patient the pet is, because kids sometimes don't understand how to treat animals until they are older.

I've heard of some other people saying that they'd use it as a last resort, if the cat was attacking them or their other pets, but it has always seemed to me that, the scratching Is a symptom of something else, maybe an illness or dysfunction or pet/human/living situational incompatibility. Removing the cats claws in a situation like that would only stop the cat from showing what's wrong in one way and they might try in another. In a situation like that, I would prefer to rehome a cat rather than remove its claws.

I hear in most other places, cat declawing isn't allowed, which is great and a sad look at the state of affairs in the US. At the end of the day I feel like there are so many other options to consider (scratching posts, slow reintroduction, soft claws, rehoming) that declawing shouldn't be an option and certainly it shouldn't be as routine and the first thing people get done when trouble starts.
WELL SAID!! ;)
 

jungle boy

Savannah Super Cat
#5
If someone's furniture is that fancy and so important to them that they are willing to amputate a cats toes, then maybe they just should not get a cat. That said, I know that some people don't realize exactly what declawing involves so I just wish that pet owners would research this thoroughly before making the decision to "declaw" (amputate). Now if someone actually does the research, is aware of the suffering that these poor kitties go through and opt to declaw anyway then in my opinion, these cats deserve better and they should NOT have a cat. :(
 

Kristin

Animal Communicator
#8
I think that everything depends on the owner/cat. Our DSH is a psycho path, so we declawed him. If he wasn't declawed, there is no way he would be alive now. There is no way he would have been able to be rehomed, and he would have had to be euthanised.
Zeddie on the other hand is amazing with her claws, she came into the house knowing where to use her claws and where it was appropriate, and doesn't bite or scratch (on purpose), so its not necessary.
I don't think declawing is worse than euthanising, and I think everyone has a certain situation where different measures are needed to be taken.