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FIP

A

AbbyP

Guest
#1
Our vet is pretty confident that we are dealing with the dry form of FIP in our 6-month-old f2 female savannah. This has been a diagnosis two months, and several hundred dollars in the making. Our girl was 5.2 lbs at her peak in November. She was going to be a very tall and beautiful melanistic savannah cat. Then she got what we thought was a cold. That turned into off-and-on high fevers. She became very lethargic and eats almost nothing. Her weight 2 1/2 months later is 4.6 lbs. She is a pile of bones on a frame that is 12 inches tall at her front shoulders. Her coat looks bad and she just prefers to sit, where she used to do extraordinary acrobatics through the house. She has been on several rounds of antibiotics, fever reducers, high calorie supplements and prescription appetite stimulants. All ineffective. Within the past week we have noticed that her hind quarters are drooping and she appears clumsy. The indicators in the bloodwork, response to treatment and symptoms have led our vet to make her final diagnosis. I would like to add that our breeder has been very responsive and helpful throughout the process. It is also important to note that this is not a disease that is the fault of any breeder. Much like MS in a human, it is a mutation of a very common virus that can occur in any cat. Although, those cats which have higer percentages of wild DNA appear to be more susceptible. We are doomed at this point since it appears the lesions on her neurological system are causing physical impairment. Not sure if there is a hail mary play here, or whether we should just get prepared to put her down before too much more pain and suffering. She has fought a heroic battle, but appears to be losing. Any thoughts you have would be appreciated
 

Xtine

Savannah Super Cat
#3
I am so very sorry.... My heart aches for you and your precious baby. I am praying for a miracle as I know they do happen.
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#4
Abby, I am so sorry! FIP in wet or dry form is terrible...I know what I would do if this was my cat, but you have to make that decision for yourself, unfortunately. There is a new drug on the market for dry FIP called PI (Polyprenyl Immunostimulant)...perhaps you can ask your vet about it? But I would not want your baby to suffer anymore...​
 

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
#5
Abby such a terrible diagnosis. Every time I is see those 3 letters, I feel as though I've been punched hard in the gut. I believe euthanasia is the right thing to do for her. I wish you strength and peace.
 

Sunny

Loyal Servant
#7
This is terrible news and my heart goes out to you both! There are new, and some also experimental, treatments that could give her months or longer with a healthier appetite and play drive if you provide your vet with some additional research. Unfortunately, the symptoms and exposure leave some vets without a lot of hands on experience with FIP and if they do, it's the wet form and treating only the symptoms. There is no cure, but you can give your baby a fighting chance at a better life before she succumbs by having a loud voice in her treatment.

You haven't mentioned if you are in a multi-cat household so there's a precautionary message that contact with fecal matter and ingesting it via grooming is a possible transmission method and creating outright separation between cats causes additional stress.
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#8
This is terrible news and my heart goes out to you both! There are new, and some also experimental, treatments that could give her months or longer with a healthier appetite and play drive if you provide your vet with some additional research. Unfortunately, the symptoms and exposure leave some vets without a lot of hands on experience with FIP and if they do, it's the wet form and treating only the symptoms. There is no cure, but you can give your baby a fighting chance at a better life before she succumbs by having a loud voice in her treatment.

You haven't mentioned if you are in a multi-cat household so there's a precautionary message that contact with fecal matter and ingesting it via grooming is a possible transmission method and creating outright separation between cats causes additional stress.
Sunny, the experimental drug is PI as mentioned above...the virus is present in cat feces but rarely passed on to other cats..
 

Marissa

Savannah Super Cat
#10
I'm so sorry to hear this, my stomach is turning just thinking about it, it sounds far too familiar.... M thoughts are with you guys, FIP is such a cruel thing :(