Savannah Cat Chat - THE Place for Savannah Cat Talk

Welcome to the Savannah Cat Chat Forum! Our forum has been in existence since 2012 and is the only one of its kind. We were here, serving the savannah cat community before Facebook and Instagram! Register for a free account today to become a member! Please use an email program other than Hotmail, since Hotmail accounts are blacklisted by many servers and ISP's. Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site in some of the forums by adding your own topics and posts. But in order to take advantage of the full features, such as a private inbox as well as connect with other members ad access some of the larger topics, a donation of $2.99/mo or $25/yr is requested. This will allow us to continue running this forum!

I Am In Trouble and Very Sad

#1
So you all know that the Savannah/Bengal cat I adopted in late June has emptied his bladder three times in my house, on valuable property.

Now to add insult to injury, his vomiting spells have ramped up drastically over the last few days. He can't seem to keep any food down and, of course, soils my cream colored wall to wall carpeting.

I took him for an emerg visit on Tuesday. Tactile exam showed nothing. No discomfort upon pressure to abdomen. Temperature normal. Not lethargic. Stools firm and normal without blood. Blood tests negative. He was given a shot of stomach medicine, a shot of subcutaneous fluid, and prescription canned special easily digestible food. His stool was checked for worms by previous owner.........negative.

He won\t eat the special food. The vet said if that happens to give him a teaspoon of his regular food, which I did....................which he threw up 3 hours later.

To add to that, his skin condition/ allergy has reappeared. Tiny scabs about the size of sesame seeds about the head and neck. Skin doc examined him in hospital and ruled out fleas or other parasites. Agrees that it is probably a food allergy. He doesn't vomit hairballs.....................but whenever he does vomit, it is often laced with a large amount of hair.

Very troubling.

Cost close to $1000.00 and he still needs a urine test.
 
Last edited:

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
#2
Did your vet ask about the possibility of an intestinal blockage?

Putting him on a whole prey diet (quail, rats, mice, guinea pigs) or a raw meat diet with the appropriate balance of meat/bones/organs would likely help with food allergies. The challenge with a food allergy is finding the allergen. The only way to do that is an elimination diet where the cat is put on a novel protein, such as rabbit, for as long as a year and then a different protein at a time is added to the diet. Cats have a tendency to be most allergic to chicken and beef. If it isn't organically raised, antibiotic & grain free meat, there's also the possibility for an animal have an allergic reaction to those as well as to what is in the feed given the chickens/cows.

If you are overwhelmed at taking care of him, either emotionally, financially, or both, perhaps you should consider handing him over to Savannah Cat Rescue http://svrescue.com/
 

Brigitte Cowell

Moderator
Staff member
#3
I'm sure that you know that the cost of pet ownership often includes unexpected vet bills, and our property might be valuable but the pet is invaluable... it is disturbing to read so much focus on the monetary side of this. Cats might pee or poop inappropriately. It is often the only way they communicate that something is wrong. Definitely unfortunate if you happen to have cream carpet of course... I recommend Anti Icky Poo and something like the Bissell little green machine on hand for those stains.

I don't think that you can rely on the former owner's stool test results, I would repeat those.

What stomach medicine was it? Cerenia? It helps to give medication names and names of the prescription foods given to help people know what is going on to offer advice btw. So often posts say a cat was given antibiotics as if those were all the same thing.

If you aren't prepared to feed a raw diet (and Witchy is correct that a raw diet is often the best option), then there are a number of options other than the prescription diets the vet usually recommends (as they make a profit from selling those foods). Petsmart and Petco usually have things like Natural Balance which offer canned and kibble varieties like "duck and pea" or "venison and pea" as limited ingredient diets that can help you work out if it is a food allergy. You want to avoid chicken and fish which are in most cat foods (even the ones labelled other things it will be somewhere in the ingredients)...
 

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
#4
LD, forgot to add that you can google "pet insurance" or do a search here. It's something to consider if you have a cat with a chronic condition.
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
#5
I agree, the vomiting and skin condition seems to be pointing to an allergy. As has been pointed out, it can be difficult to pinpoint the source of the allergy, but I would recommend starting with a protein that he has never eaten before, such as rabbit, duck, or quail. Be sure to read the labels on the current foods so you know exactly what is in them, as well as the labels of any new foods.

As for the inappropriate urination, I don't remember the story behind those incidents so can't offer any suggestions that might be pertinent to his situation.
 

Stephanie L

Savannah Super Cat
#6
I do not have nearly the experience as the ladies above, but one of my savannahs had inappropriate urinating issues the first few months after we adopted him. I understand firsthand how this can test your patience! When we adopted him he was use to pine pellet/horse bedding for his litter box, I fell in love with this type of litter. Upon researching, trying to figure out a solution, I found out the majority of cats do not like pine pellets, it may hurt their paws, especially older cats. This can cause them to urinate outside of the box if they do not like the litter used. I believe in one of your other posts you mention using pine pellets. I bought another litter box, filled it with cat attract and placed my cat gently in it leaving the other box with the pellets. Make sure these boxes are separated. Since I have done this my cat no longer has litter box issues nor do we use pine pellets anymore. After a month of using cat attract litter I gradually changed to Dr Elseys multi cat litter. Even if your cat used pine pellets in the past their preferences can change over time, it's worth try.

One sign the cat doesnt like the litter used is having his front paws on the edge of the box or all 4 paws on the edge of the box when they do choose to use it. If your kitty uses the box praise him as soon as he's finished. You may also need a larger box if your using a traditional size litter box. Please do not give up on him, please try changing the litter used, it may help if you are using pellets. Most pet stores will allow you to return the litter if the cat doesn't like it as long as its more than half the bag.

The only reason I'm thinking you cat doesnt like the litter is because there are no health concerns.?. My DSH would only urinate outside the box when he had a UTI, it was his way of letting me know he was sick.

Best of luck!! All these ladies are very, very knowledgeable and give great advice even though sometimes the truth hurts to hear. I have spent a lot of time just reading this forum to learn.
 
#7
I'm sure that you know that the cost of pet ownership often includes unexpected vet bills, and our property might be valuable but the pet is invaluable... it is disturbing to read so much focus on the monetary side of this. Cats might pee or poop inappropriately. It is often the only way they communicate that something is wrong. Definitely unfortunate if you happen to have cream carpet of course... I recommend Anti Icky Poo and something like the Bissell little green machine on hand for those stains.

I don't think that you can rely on the former owner's stool test results, I would repeat those.

What stomach medicine was it? Cerenia? It helps to give medication names and names of the prescription foods given to help people know what is going on to offer advice btw. So often posts say a cat was given antibiotics as if those were all the same thing.

If you aren't prepared to feed a raw diet (and Witchy is correct that a raw diet is often the best option), then there are a number of options other than the prescription diets the vet usually recommends (as they make a profit from selling those foods). Petsmart and Petco usually have things like Natural Balance which offer canned and kibble varieties like "duck and pea" or "venison and pea" as limited ingredient diets that can help you work out if it is a food allergy. You want to avoid chicken and fish which are in most cat foods (even the ones labelled other things it will be somewhere in the ingredients)...

Thanks for the advice. The medicine was Cerenia.

Not focused on the financial side of this, just hoping that the money spent will find the problem(s). In a short time I have become very attached to Indy and am doing everything I can to avoid having to give him up. I have three people who want him, with his problems.

He was on Natural Balance when I got him. I was feeding him Royal Canin which he loved but now won't touch the Natural Balance anymore. Since he won' t eat the Natural Balance, I'm going to put him on something else that is grain, fish, beef, and chicken free. I'll look for something that contains only duck, venison and peas.
 
#8
Did your vet ask about the possibility of an intestinal blockage?

Putting him on a whole prey diet (quail, rats, mice, guinea pigs) or a raw meat diet with the appropriate balance of meat/bones/organs would likely help with food allergies. The challenge with a food allergy is finding the allergen. The only way to do that is an elimination diet where the cat is put on a novel protein, such as rabbit, for as long as a year and then a different protein at a time is added to the diet. Cats have a tendency to be most allergic to chicken and beef. If it isn't organically raised, antibiotic & grain free meat, there's also the possibility for an animal have an allergic reaction to those as well as to what is in the feed given the chickens/cows.

If you are overwhelmed at taking care of him, either emotionally, financially, or both, perhaps you should consider handing him over to Savannah Cat Rescue http://svrescue.com/

Yes they want to do an ultrasound test on him.

I'm bringing him in today and hopefully they can get some urine from him.

I think the vomiting is stress related, along with the occasional urination.

If his urine checks OK, I'll ask about a feline tranquilizer to tide him over until he fully adjusts to my home.

I'll postpone the ultrasound to see how effective the tranquilizer is first. I'll also change his diet to something containing only duck, peas and venison.
 

Rafiki

Site Supporter
#9
I have used both Feliway diffusers and Liquid Nutricalm to relieve stress. I was able to add the Liquid Nutricalm directly to the food. I started by adding 1 drop and slowly built up until I got to the full amount (about 10 drops). I originally bought the Nutricalm thru the vet but it is also available thru Amazon.
 

John Popp

Site Supporter
#10
I'll postpone the ultrasound to see how effective the tranquilizer is first. I'll also change his diet to something containing only duck, peas and venison.
Venison is a hugely protein rich food and not what I would consider to be a good first choice.

I'd also recommend placing a priority on the ultrasound to see if there is a blockage and buy yourself a bottle of bourbon for a tranquilizer. Reading gently from a book in a room with your cat will go a lot further than a tranquilizer, and the ultrasound could reveal something that would save their life.