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Marketing Terms

#1
Okay- instead of constantly clogging up other threads, let's do it... Let's hash out what is a term used for marketing Savannahs and what are accurate terms in regard to the breed.

Let's start with terms you will see used everywhere. Savannahs may be described by their generation- F1, F2, F3, etc. Savannahs may be described in regard to their outcrosses (That is an A cat- that is an SBT). Savannahs may be described in regard to their coat color (That is a BST (often one differentiates between warm BST and cool- but a BST is a BST). Savannahs may be described as standard or nonstandard in regard to color (this actually is incorrect terminology, but the colloquial layperson's terms- it is more appropriate to use permissible and nonpermissible in regard to color because it refers to colors permitted in the show hall).

If you don't understand any of those terms- feel free to ask questions!

Now- what terms are used for marketing? Here is one I actually discussed with another breeder yesterday...

"High percentage"

Now- it's a common term used in the community, but the question is- what makes a high percentage cat? The original theory behind the Savannah genetics is an F1 is 50% African Serval, an F2 is 25%, etc. So does that mean if I produce a 26% F2- is this a high percentage F2?

What do YOU think? What makes a 'high percentage' cat in your eyes?

Obviously- another term we've seen brought up on this site is 'elite'. This isn't a common term used, but it's been tossed out there. What do YOU think an 'elite' Savannah is? What makes a Savannah 'elite' in your eyes?

Another term is human-bonded (I believe)... What do YOU think a 'human-bonded' Savannah is? What makes one Savannah more 'human-bonded' then another?

What other marketing terms are you seeing? Is there a term you are unsure of- whether it's good marketing or an appropriate term for the breed?
 
#2
Here's a term I don't think most Savannah people know- 'glitter'. It sounds super desirable because it's that is reminiscent of richness, luxuriousness...

Glitter is defined by TICA as, "The natural deep glow, shine or sparkle created by a clear layer or bubbles within the hair shaft which reflects light readily. Often seen in Bengals and Toygers."

It is not a marketing term, but a descriptive term. Attached is a photo of an F6 SBT with glitter in his coat. One interesting note is that a glittered pelt is actually much softer then the coat wanted in the show hall Savannah.
 

Attachments

SV Dad

Site Supporter
#3
I like this idea.
For me , I don't want to upset the folks around here.
My set of terms.
F1, F2, F3 etc. are the generations from the Serval. I don't think a big argument will occur on this. F2.5 is 100% BS.
Standard and non-standard are equal to permissible and non-permissible. Just semantics, for me anyway.
I was confused about BST, thinking it might be a dyslexic SBT. Brown Spotted Tabby is not Stud Book Tradition.
TICA breed standard is the definition for showing cats and the current goal for the breed at SBT level.

The rest of the "descriptors" is marketing puffery. This puffery plays hand in hand with supply demand economics. The puffery marketing is confusing to people investigating the breed, and those who have not read deeply into this breed and its development. These are not cheap cats. At this price point we are discussing disposable income. And this puffery is used to enhance the value of the product.

I like the point made: There are essentially segmented markets in the SV cat world. The early generations F1-F4, and the latter F5 and greater SBT cats. That is not to say a breeder does not tap into both markets. That is not to say that many desirable traits are exclusive to either of the segmented market.

It may be helpful to note that "elite", "high percentage", "hand raised", "socialized", "human bonded", "inky", "large", generally any addon description not specifically in the breed standard, is for all intents and purposes marketing terms for product enhancement.

For the quality breeders producing SBT kittens, these marketing terms only confuse the potential customer who may or may not be looking for their particular product.

For the foundation breeders (F1-F4), as there is no formal reference for descriptors, it is open season on product advertising. Pricing, which appears to be a touchy subject, is quite subjective. This is where an informed customer with clearly defined objectives match their desires with price.

I don't feel at this point there is a way to define these subjective descriptors to a standard. This being said, these descriptors basically are opinions, and should be treated as such.

Edit.....I like that we can get a little lively. I really don't want the breeders to feel we are attacking them. This is really like a bar where we go to shoot the breeze. Notice we keep coming back to chat!
 
Last edited:

scorpius

Chirps & Massive Headbutts
#4
"High percentage"

Now- it's a common term used in the community, but the question is- what makes a high percentage cat? The original theory behind the Savannah genetics is an F1 is 50% African Serval, an F2 is 25%, etc. So does that mean if I produce a 26% F2- is this a high percentage F2?

What do YOU think? What makes a 'high percentage' cat in your eyes?
Good question. Maybe a minimum factor applied to the generation? 1.25x or 1.5x? Personally, I don't invision a 26% F2 as HP.

I know it's just marketing.... But I took a look at a bunch of F1 pix a while back, who all had their percentages designated. At 75%, the F1's began to take on a "very Servally look" to me compared to those in the 50-60% range. So for me at least, I might think a 1.5x+ factor to the generation. Just one of many opines I'm sure, just trying to back it up with my own observations ;). dj
 

SV Dad

Site Supporter
#5
At 75%, the F1's began to take on a "very Servally look" to me compared to those in the 50-60% range. So for me at least, I might think a 1.5x+ factor to the generation. . dj
For an informed buyer, the term "high percentage" while theoretical, does give evidence of a specialization of a sort. Stating the theoretical percentage does help in the information department. And odds are that you will notice the difference (but not at 26% versus 25%!). Whereas you and I understand the difference, first time buyers might not.
 
#6
I like this idea.
I don't feel at this point there is a way to define these subjective descriptors to a standard. This being said, these descriptors basically are opinions, and should be treated as such.
!
IS hand raised actually puffery or a descriptive term for how the kittens are raised in the cattery setting? While it's not a term used within TICA (which just sets a standard for the breed to strive towards)- is it the same as calling one group of kittens 'Superior' and others not? (I think that is another term being used?)

BUT- regardless of how a kitten is labeled, one should always ask questions. Hand raised- what exactly do you mean by this? Your thought process on it might not be the same as the breeder's or the breeder might be just using that so-called puffery to mask how she/he actually raises said kittens.

As far as the TICA standard goes to describe the F1s-F3s- it still is significant. For example, our F2s are F2Bs. They are BST, BST and white, and Blue spotted with white. Um- something else I wanted to say, but forgot...
 
#7
I prefer breeders use the percentage in their descriptive of the so-called HP cats. ALTHOUGH- it's important to note- that is theoretical and not a proven percentage. Genetics don't work as perfectly as we think and after F1, it's all theoretical versus scientifically proven.
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#9
I like this idea.
For me , I don't want to upset the folks around here.
My set of terms.
F1, F2, F3 etc. are the generations from the Serval. I don't think a big argument will occur on this. F2.5 is 100% BS.
Standard and non-standard are equal to permissible and non-permissible. Just semantics, for me anyway.
I was confused about BST, thinking it might be a dyslexic SBT. Brown Spotted Tabby is not Stud Book Tradition.
TICA breed standard is the definition for showing cats and the current goal for the breed at SBT level.

The rest of the "descriptors" is marketing puffery. This puffery plays hand in hand with supply demand economics. The puffery marketing is confusing to people investigating the breed, and those who have not read deeply into this breed and its development. These are not cheap cats. At this price point we are discussing disposable income. And this puffery is used to enhance the value of the product.

I like the point made: There are essentially segmented markets in the SV cat world. The early generations F1-F4, and the latter F5 and greater SBT cats. That is not to say a breeder does not tap into both markets. That is not to say that many desirable traits are exclusive to either of the segmented market.

It may be helpful to note that "elite", "high percentage", "hand raised", "socialized", "human bonded", "inky", "large", generally any addon description not specifically in the breed standard, is for all intents and purposes marketing terms for product enhancement.

For the quality breeders producing SBT kittens, these marketing terms only confuse the potential customer who may or may not be looking for their particular product.

For the foundation breeders (F1-F4), as there is no formal reference for descriptors, it is open season on product advertising. Pricing, which appears to be a touchy subject, is quite subjective. This is where an informed customer with clearly defined objectives match their desires with price.

I don't feel at this point there is a way to define these subjective descriptors to a standard. This being said, these descriptors basically are opinions, and should be treated as such.

Edit.....I like that we can get a little lively. I really don't want the breeders to feel we are attacking them. This is really like a bar where we go to shoot the breeze. Notice we keep coming back to chat!
We don't mind lively at all, although I know I sometimes get a bit frustrated ;) And we enjoy you all and the lively discussions...gives us all pause for thought, I think.
 

SV Dad

Site Supporter
#10
IS hand raised actually puffery or a descriptive term for how the kittens are raised in the cattery setting? While it's not a term used within TICA (which just sets a standard for the breed to strive towards)- is it the same as calling one group of kittens 'Superior' and others not? (I think that is another term being used?)

BUT- regardless of how a kitten is labeled, one should always ask questions. Hand raised- what exactly do you mean by this? Your thought process on it might not be the same as the breeder's or the breeder might be just using that so-called puffery to mask how she/he actually raises said kittens.

As far as the TICA standard goes to describe the F1s-F3s- it still is significant. For example, our F2s are F2Bs. They are BST, BST and white, and Blue spotted with white. Um- something else I wanted to say, but forgot...
From all perspectives, I think this is a big problem. I feel hand raising is critical to the breed, in that these cats tend to have a unique personality that needs to be developed at a critical kitten stage. This will also help to "prove" domesticity as we endeavor to remove restrictive laws going forward. I can not think of a way to define hand raised, and yet this is so crucial.
And yes, at the moment, it is puffery.