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New kitten

K

KIM

Guest
#1
I have a new male savannah kitten. He is 15 weeks old and we picked him up a week ago. We set up a small room for him to acclimate. We are all adults in here, and no other pets. We did have a bengal that sadly passed away from lymphoma so I am used to the high energy chatty cat. Stark is very shy and a little timid, He gets scared sometimes. I tried letting him out of the safe room and he seems scared and all he did was hide. Hes coming around but would love some advice on how to get him to come around. We sit and play with him but hes still a bit standoffish. Having said that he ate out of my hand and hes not as skittish as he was a couple days ago. I cant wait to kiss and cuddle him if he would let me!!
 

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
#2
Can you move him into your bedroom and extend his quarantine for another week or so? Keep him in the room and continue interacting with him as you now are. Might mean you lose a few hours sleep. If he's been with you only a week, it might be too soon for him to feel comfortable with access to the rest of the house. If you don't want to move him into your bedroom, keep him in the safe room for another week or two.

If he still acts scared after another week or two in the bedroom, bring him out into the rest of the house in a crate and put it near you and let him see and hear the rest of the house from the safety of the crate. You can do that for a day or two and then, while you're in the same room, open the crate door and let him come out on his own to explore. If he dashes into the crate after awhile, just leave him be. He'll probably extend his exploration a little at a time or he may "get it" straight away and realize that the whole house is his playground.
 
K

KIM

Guest
#3
Thank you, I figured that I needed to do that. They told me to do that with my bengal but he was fine after a few days. Stark is shy, but I am noticing an improvement each day. I just dont want to let him out and have him feel overwhelmed and set him back. Hes a great baby, and I know is just a matter of time!
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
#4
I would definitely leave him in his safe room for at least another week. Once he starts showing confidence toward you then you can start letting him out of the room for short, supervised periods of time. I usually recommend introducing him to one part of the house at a time. So if his door leads to a hallway then after a couple of weeks let him explore the hallway - you can play with a wand toy or toss a ball to get him more relaxed. Once he is comfortable there you can let him explore the next accessible area of the house.

As for getting him more comfortable with you, as Deborah suggested, moving him into your bedroom may be helpful - that way he can 'check you out' while you're safe and sleeping. You will also spend more physical time in his presence, even if it is not playing with him. If you are unable to do that then try to spend as much time in the safe room as possible. Take a book, or your computer in with you. When you're not playing with him read aloud so that he can get comfortable with your voice. If at all possible try to sleep in there with him, or at least take some naps from time to time.

Mostly (and I can tell you know this, but just to reiterate) he needs time, patience, and love. You have already seen some progress, so you know it is possible. You may not see progress every day, and you might even see an occasional setback, but I think with time he will come around and learn to love you as much as you love him :in love:
 
K

KIM

Guest
#5
Oh he is so sweet. I know hes still nervous and he is shy and i knew that. Its hard to let him just upstairs as i have no way of blocking the stairs. I can close all the bedroom doors so its limited but downstairs is open concept. He is slowly coming around and starting to engage in play. We all talk
To him and he ate out of my hand last night and tonight and i petted him with the other. I know he will be fine. I just want to make sure im doing all the right things.
 

Kanadian

Savannah Super Cat
#6
Just like Patti said I think sleeping in the same room makes unreal progress! Even if you can't take him to your bedroom, going in his safe room to sleep for a while is a good way for him to feel unthreatened and able to scope you out. Congrats on your little guy :)
 

Carykd7kau

Reincarnated cat Moderator
#7
Congratulations Kim on Stark coming into your life. The advise given already is all I would have to say, so I will just say keep on keepin' on. He will soon open up to you and maybe the rest of you all too. :)
 
K

KIM

Guest
#8
He is opening up to all of us slowly. Just needed more advice to help him along. Hes just so gorgeous and precioud. Do i let him do more exploring once he comes right to us when we go to his safe room?
 

Carykd7kau

Reincarnated cat Moderator
#9
Me personally, I would wait till he exhibits some curiosity on what's on the other side of the door. He needs to know the room is a SAFE room, and he is not going to be forced out. Let HIM call the shots. Be patient.
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
#10
I would stick to the two week minimum to keep him in the safe room. If he starts trying to dart out on his own then you can consider letting him out sooner, but only if he shows real interest in what is going on on the other side of the door.