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New kitty health questions

aharter

Savannah Super Cat
Hey everyone, I have a few questions regarding prevention of any illnesses in my new savannah kitten. I am super paranoid about FIP. Is there certain things I should avoid when my kitten is young or in general? Supplements I can give to prevent the likelihood? Also when it comes time to have my kitten spayed do I need to request a certain anesthetic ? My kitten is an f4 savannah. I will be getting her at 12 weeks and she will have at least her first round of kitten shots. If not the second , those will be done the week I get her or whenever they are supposed to be done.
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
The only way to ensure that your new kitten will never get FIP is to make sure she doesn't have the corona virus. Since probably around 90% of cats have corona your first step is to get a titer to confirm it's presence. BTW, you can have false negatives so a good rule of thumb to follow is to get at least two, or preferably three negative titers in a row.

Presuming that the titer is positive (usually a titer greater than 1:40 is considered positive, although some don't consider it positive unless it's greater than 1:100), and that she is an only kitten the best way to eliminate corona is to change litter and sterilize the litter box and pooper scooper with bleach every time she has a bowel movement, or at least daily - that way she cannot keep reinfecting herself. This is a lot of work, and can obviously be expensive going through litter like that, and if you have more than one cat you need to quarantine each and do the same thing, otherwise they will keep infecting each other. Most cats will eventually shed the corona virus it they do not keep getting reinfected from themselves, or other cats, but about 13% of cats will remain lifelong carriers. That's not to mean that they will convert to FIP - that is an entirely different matter. Since it is not yet completely understood why cats with corona virus convert to FIP (although research is making strides in this area) there is no known way to prevent it from happening if your kitten happens to be one that is susceptible to it.


Some of the things that seem to trigger the conversion to FIP is stress (e.g., the stress of moving to a new home), illness, very young or very old cats, and having a genetic predisposition. The only things you can really impact on this list are stress and illness, and that would be hard since the simple act of bringing her home will cause her stress, and stress can trigger illness. You will need to do your best to help her transition smoothly and easily into your home (there are other threads on bringing home a new kitten on this forum that you can read). You can prevent illness also by avoiding future stressful events, and not allowing her to interact with other cats - easy if she is an only cat.
 

aharter

Savannah Super Cat
Thank you everyone so much! That was some really good information and now I understand fip a lot better. I think it will help that she is the only pet. I am also so glad I am now waiting until 12 weeks to take her home. I think if she was inclined taking her home that early wouldn't help at all.

So does anyone know about anesthesia used for spaying? Do I need to request a certain one. I was reading some threads but it seems to be a personal opinion.

Another question that I jus thought of, and need some advice on. One Christmas this year might be 3 hours away, and they will have a 2 year old cat. The cat gets all of it's vaccines. Would it be a bad idea or a good idea to take my new kitten? She would be about 14 weeks by then. I may just stay home with her if a trip would be too stressful and make her susceptible to illness. Just wanting some advice on the issue . Thanks everyone for all of your help!! :)
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
Sorry to not have responded about the anesthesia earlier. There have been many anecdotal stories about ill effects and bad outcomes with the use of ketamine (an injectable induction agent) in all breeds of cats so I generally recommend avoiding it if possible. Having said that, some vets are now using a cocktail that includes ketamine, some of these concoctions seem to be safer. Personally I prefer propofol, and my vets are happy to comply. As far as I know, all of the gas anesthesias are safe. Here is a journal article with more info: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1481480/?page=1

As for traveling with your new kitten just a couple of weeks after bringing her home - that will need to be your decision. I would probably recommend against it, two weeks is barely time for her to settle in and grow accustomed to her new home and family, if you suddenly change everything up again, it will create stress on top of stress (the other cat is only one of many factors that will create stress - new people, new environment, hours driving in a crate, etc.). On the other hand, she may come home to you and seem to adjust within 24-48 hours and you feel that she would do fine with a road trip. If you do decide to take her though, I would keep her separated from the other cat. There are many threads on the forum on how to introduce two cats to each other, and all of them involve at least a couple of weeks for proper introductions.
 

aharter

Savannah Super Cat
Patti, thank you so much for your advice. I will talk to my vet about using propofol.

I will see how well she adjusts and sounds like regardless she will not get to meet the other kitty. Which won't be a problem because there are plenty of bedrooms that she can hang out in with me. If she isn't doing good at all though I will just stay home with her.

Ahhh I really appreciate all the knowledge everyone on this site has to offer ! It puts my mind at more ease.
 

Kristin

Animal Communicator
The only way to ensure that your new kitten will never get FIP is to make sure she doesn't have the corona virus. Since probably around 90% of cats have corona your first step is to get a titer to confirm it's presence. BTW, you can have false negatives so a good rule of thumb to follow is to get at least two, or preferably three negative titers in a row.

Presuming that the titer is positive (usually a titer greater than 1:40 is considered positive, although some don't consider it positive unless it's greater than 1:100), and that she is an only kitten the best way to eliminate corona is to change litter and sterilize the litter box and pooper scooper with bleach every time she has a bowel movement, or at least daily - that way she cannot keep reinfecting herself. This is a lot of work, and can obviously be expensive going through litter like that, and if you have more than one cat you need to quarantine each and do the same thing, otherwise they will keep infecting each other. Most cats will eventually shed the corona virus it they do not keep getting reinfected from themselves, or other cats, but about 13% of cats will remain lifelong carriers. That's not to mean that they will convert to FIP - that is an entirely different matter. Since it is not yet completely understood why cats with corona virus convert to FIP (although research is making strides in this area) there is no known way to prevent it from happening if your kitten happens to be one that is susceptible to it.


Some of the things that seem to trigger the conversion to FIP is stress (e.g., the stress of moving to a new home), illness, very young or very old cats, and having a genetic predisposition. The only things you can really impact on this list are stress and illness, and that would be hard since the simple act of bringing her home will cause her stress, and stress can trigger illness. You will need to do your best to help her transition smoothly and easily into your home (there are other threads on bringing home a new kitten on this forum that you can read). You can prevent illness also by avoiding future stressful events, and not allowing her to interact with other cats - easy if she is an only cat.

So if a cat carries FeCoV it is possible to 'fix' it? When Zeddie got her PCR done it showed that she carries for it. I haven't gotten Tiger checked at all, but if I can get her completely rid of it, it would put my mind at ease. Zeddie hasn't had any problems since May, but I am thinking I will get her blood work checked and a full PCR in the spring again to see how her organs are/if she is still a carrier
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
It's possible, but you would have to assume, if the two cats are interacting and sharing litter boxes then they are both infected, so you would have to isolate and treat both.
 

Kristin

Animal Communicator
Tiger can't get into Zeddie's litter boxes (thankfully) but I will put litter liners in their litter boxes and then toss them every BM. Zeddie only goes once a day, so that is easy. Tiger is a bit trickier...worth it though. FIP scares the crap out of me too.
 
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