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NEWS: Cats Adore, Manipulate Women

D

Dantes

Guest
http://news.discovery.com/animals/p...9350733866&SREF=CustomerSite&SFBState=Unknown

Cats may try to hide their true feelings, but a recent study found that cats do actually pay attention to their owners, distinguishing them from all other people.
The study, which will be published in the July issue of Animal Cognition, is one of the few to examine the cat/human social dynamic from the feline's perspective. Cats may not do what we tell them to, but they usually adore their human caretakers.

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Co-author Atsuko Saito of The University of Tokyo explained to Discovery News that dogs have evolved, and are bred, "to follow their owner's orders, but cats have not been. So sometimes cats appear aloof, but they have special relationships with their owners."
NEWS: Cats Adore, Manipulate Women

"Previous studies suggest that cats have evolved to behave like kittens (around their owners), and humans treat cats similar to the way that they treat babies," co-author Kazutaka Shinozuka of the University of South Florida College of Medicine added. "To form such baby-parent like relationships, recognition of owners might be important for cats."
Their study, mostly conducted in the homes of cats so as not to unduly upset or worry the felines, determined just that.
The researchers played recordings of strangers, as well as of the cats' owners, to the felines. The cats could not see the speakers.
The cats responded to human voices, not by communicative behavior- such as by vocalizing or moving their tails -- but by orienting behavior. In this case, "orienting" meant that the cats moved their ears and heads toward the source of each voice.
The felines also, at times, displayed pupil dilation, which can be a sign of powerful emotions, such as arousal and excitement. Other studies have found that natural pupil dilation can be directly tied to brain activity, revealing mental reactions to emotional stimuli.
All of these reactions happened more often when cats heard their owners, and particularly after they had become habituated to, or familiar with, the strangers' voices.
The feline reactions are therefore very subtle, but cats have evolved not to be very demonstrative.
Cats, for example, hide illness because "in the wild, no one can rescue them and predators pay attention to such weak individuals," Saito said. Even though a watchful owner would try to save the cat, the feline's gut reaction is to remain stoic and avoid any possible threat at a time of vulnerability.
 

rypka

Savannah Super Cat
"a recent study found that cats do actually pay attention to their owners, distinguishing them from all other people."

Well, this would be kind of silly if they didn't..My guiney pig recognizes HER people 100%..And I bet other pets with smaller intelligence do as well (never owned a bird for example)..So of course, we can assume that any animal with higher intelligence have to recognize "its people"..
 

Tort518

Savannah Super Cat
Crows and Parrots have proven to be tool users, and crows are also too makers. Both are good problem solvers.

The octopus, despite only a few year lifespan is also a problem solver, but has little need for tools due to all the prehensil limbs.
 

Kristin

Animal Communicator
I think all animals recognize their owners. My friend had a snake that would smell her out and get back to her when someone else was holding him.
I have parrots and they not only recognize me, they yell at me, tell me to do things...not unlike a savannah :p
 
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