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Unsure of generation to purchase

Enigmatic.eyez

Savannah Super Cat
SBT f1 etc.... I understand the different generations but am unsure of where to start. Price isn't really an issue. Under 10k...I realize they are pricey.

I have kids, dog(s) in the house. I want the kitten to bond with me mainly.

Then...male or female?

Do you pick the cat or does the cat pick you?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
What age are your children? How much time each day will you have to devote to your Savannah? Have you owned cats before? What does your household look like - bare bones, lots of knick knacks, one floor or several, kids leave things lying around, lots of exposed wiring, etc.?

As I'm sure you've know from your research an F1 can potentially be demanding on your time and damaging to your home. They tend to find trouble more easily and are much more persistent in trying to get what they want. I have a couple of young F2s here who are also like this, but as you get further away from the serval they become less persistent in their behaviors.

As for who picks whom, it can go either way. Your best bet is to visit a lot of websites and look at what's available. You may end up inquiring about several different kittens, or one may catch your eye and that will be it for you.
 

Jason E

Savannah Super Cat
SBT f1 etc.... I understand the different generations but am unsure of where to start. Price isn't really an issue. Under 10k...I realize they are pricey.

I have kids, dog(s) in the house. I want the kitten to bond with me mainly.

Then...male or female?

Do you pick the cat or does the cat pick you?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I'm going to let the people that actually own savannahs elaborate more, but from looking at savannahs for several months now, there are certain kittens that will stand out to you, at least some do to me. While several breeders will say their cats get a long with dogs and other animals, If I already owned a dog, I would look for breeders that own dogs that the kittens grow up with for the first 9-14 weeks of their lives, but it is of course not a necessity. Its important to get a well socialized kitten first whether it was socialized with dogs around or not, but it may help narrow down your cattery choice.

As for generation, generally that is something that is controlled, in my opinion, by lifestyle, desires, price and most importantly your state and local laws. Your state's laws may make your choice for you, as several states don't allow early generation hybrids, and a handful don't allow hybrids at all.

One can always hope a cat will bond to them, but with a family i would imagine its hard to get a cat to bond closely with just one person, even an F1, which usually only bonds with one person strongly, unless significant one on one time is spent with it.

Patti nailed it, beat me to it.
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
I'm going to let the people that actually own savannahs elaborate more, but from looking at savannahs for several months now, there are certain kittens that will stand out to you, at least some do to me. While several breeders will say their cats get a long with dogs and other animals, If I already owned a dog, I would look for breeders that own dogs that the kittens grow up with for the first 9-14 weeks of their lives, but it is of course not a necessity. Its important to get a well socialized kitten first whether it was socialized with dogs around or not, but it may help narrow down your cattery choice.

As for generation, generally that is something that is controlled, in my opinion, by lifestyle, desires, price and most importantly your state and local laws. Your state's laws may make your choice for you, as several states don't allow early generation hybrids, and a handful don't allow hybrids at all.

One can always hope a cat will bond to them, but with a family i would imagine its hard to get a cat to bond closely with just one person, even an F1, which usually only bonds with one person strongly, unless significant one on one time is spent with it.

Patti nailed it, beat me to it.

jason, I disagree...my kittens do not grow up with dogs, yet every single one of them lives with a dog...and there was no issue integrating. Savannahs and dogs just seem to get along, as long as intros are done correctly.

Same goes for kids - I do not have any, yet some of my savannah kittens love with and love kids...a well socialized kitten will do well with kids, dogs and other animals...
 

Jason E

Savannah Super Cat
jason, I disagree...my kittens do not grow up with dogs, yet every single one of them lives with a dog...and there was no issue integrating. Savannahs and dogs just seem to get along, as long as intros are done correctly.

Same goes for kids - I do not have any, yet some of my savannah kittens love with and love kids...a well socialized kitten will do well with kids, dogs and other animals...

I thought that was also the point I made, by suggesting it was not a necessity, I certainly did not mean that a savannah needed to grow up around kids or a dog to live with them happily, as I then said a well socialized kitten is most important. I suppose I left too much to infer by suggesting that. My brain is a bit mangled after 3 18 hour days of civil procedure :).

IF I could edit my original post to be more clear, I would, but I realize there is a strict time limit (or some other limit to editing a post :p.)
 
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admin

Paige
Staff member
I thought that was also the point I made, by suggesting it was not a necessity, I certainly did not mean that a savannah needed to grow up around kids or a dog to live with them happily, as I then said a well socialized kitten is most important. I suppose I left too much to infer by suggesting that. My brain is a bit mangled after 3 18 hour days of civil procedure :).

And I should have added that my kittens do interact with children often - the neighborhood kids all come and play with them...my own savannahs love dogs and are like dogs, so maybe that is why they do so well with dog - LOL! J/K
 

Brigitte Cowell

Moderator
Staff member
I think the questions of how old your kids are, the amount of time available to interact with your new pet, breakability of your household ornaments etc are good ones.

it is my personal opinion that F1s are not the best pet for most households. They are amazing creatures and I adore my two F1 girls, but they are a lot of work and not the easiest of pets. I truly believe that the better choice is an F2 or even a typey F3 even if the exotic looks are a priority for you. I also think that there are a lot of SBTs in F4-6 that are really distinctive cats that are also good choices. I just think that if you look for a later generation then there is more importance to be placed in the breeder/program the kitten comes from as it requires a good selective process to reach the lower generations and have a cat that is unmistakeably a Savannah and not reflecting strongly the outcrosses used. If you want size, then a male kitten is suggested, as the females rarely reach the size their brothers do.

And then as pointed out, it is the individual kitten whose pictures will speak to you and that one is the one for you...whether it is standard/nonstandard, early/late generation, male/female...

I generally advise you select the breeder and get their help also... most good breeders will direct you to the right kitten for your household :)
 

tj_johnson

Savannah Super Cat
Just a note that I love this thread as we're also in the process of researching for our first (pet, not breeder) Savannah. I've had some of the same questions and appreciate these explanations.

One question I've had a few different answers to, though, is about gender. We have an "alpha" male kitty with a very dog-like personality, and a sweet but timid female who is super shy. The male is neutered, the female spayed, and both are three and a half years old.

Given that, is it recommended to introduce a male kitten to the household, or a female? I've received lots of conflicting opinions - heard females are more likely to fight, males are more likely to spray, and also heard that it makes no difference if they are all altered. Any thoughts?
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
Well I would say that if the animal is altered then neither gender should spray but if kept intact both males and females spray so no advantage one way or the other in that instance. Otherwise, in my personal experience I find that male cats are more laid back and females more bossy, but I would not expect them (females) to pick fights if they are altered - that seems to be more of a territorial issue with intact females.

I would worry about introducing a Savannah into a home with a shy, timid cat - she may turn into prey for the Savannah, so may need to be kept separated, or at least where there is a lot of vertical space for her to retreat to.
 

Brigitte Cowell

Moderator
Staff member
I definitely advocate considering the needs and personalities of all existing pets before adding a new one. Sadly many don't and we end up in Rescue taking in an older cat because they brought in more cats and they don't get along...behavioral issues arise and often sadly the cute kitten gets to stay and the older kitty is surrendered :-(

It sounds like you would need to consider the specific personality of a kitten to introduce to a household with an alpha type male and a timid female... both so that the male is not threatened and the female is not seen as a prey toy by the Savannah. I'd probably suggest a later generation male but it completely would depend on the personality of the kitten so choosing your breeder to help you learn about the kitten personality is key!
 
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