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Why so many rounds of fvrcp vaccine in kittens

Bekki

Savannah Super Cat
#1
I know this is probably a little ignorant of me to question medicine but I am just trying to understand the whys. I bet my vet is going to hate me lol. So my Loki recieved his fvrcp shot last week. Finally =] and hell be sent to me this coming week about 10 days after he recieved the shot. I will need to schedule the second shot about a week and a half from the day I get him. why is it they recommend 3 shots if you vaccinate younger and two shots if you vaccinate at 16 weeks or older? why are there multiples in the first place is it because the immune system isn't developed yet? But at 16 weeks it is? how come there is only one rabies vaccine in comparison? Is it a stronger dose?


"Those who wander aren't always lost"
 
#2
The first set is a hit or miss type vaccine due to the mother's immunity. It may still be in their system and it may not be-- so the early set is sometimes supplemented by a third set. However, not all vets do a third set nowadays-- some vets are quite content with two sets at 8 weeks and 12 weeks.

Vaccines are all created specifically to handle certain diseases. I couldn't tell you why rabies is one shot versus a series of vaccines, but someone who has more medical knowledge is sure to stroll along :)
 

Bekki

Savannah Super Cat
#3
I'll have to bug my friend in school for vet tech. About that one once she studies pharmacology.


"Those who wander aren't always lost"
 

Bekki

Savannah Super Cat
#4
I saw a study done on puppies 14-16 weeks they have them their first shot of distemper vaccine and 5 hours later let them in a room with dogs known to be positive for distemper. None of the puppies contracted it. but who is to know that the mothers immune system wasn't still effecting their resilience at that age it's a possibility right? I Dont know if you could completely use that as a controlled experiment. It was interesting to say the least how coulda vaccine help protect that soon.


"Those who wander aren't always lost"
 
#5
They have a basic window of immunity for momma milk, but there is some room for variance. How long mom nursed, etc, will effect them as well as individual issues (say kitten a may have decided kibble was the bomb at six weeks and basically stopped nursing, but kitten b nursed full on until six weeks,.but nibbled/nursed until eight weeks).

So to be safe, vets do usually do three sets to finish the kitten series.

Sent from my so called smartphone so all typos and bad advice can be blamed on said "smart" phone ;)
 

Bekki

Savannah Super Cat
#6
So basically it only takes 1 vaccine to actually immunize but because of trial and error they like to err on the side of caution and do a shot younger to be safe since it could kill the kitten of they contracted something. Vaccinate again once their immune system is more developed. Which might work 75% of the time and then once more to be 100% sure that it took. rabies isn't given until 16 weeks right? And that is once the immune system is already developed enough. and even though a 1 year vaccine can protect for life if completely successful they like to be careful and vaccinate every year. kinda like deworming no matter what and assuming the parents had worms. Because its better to be safe than sorry? Do I have that right? or is that the gist of it at least? Lol now it kinda makes sense in my head. But that's of I understand what you're saying


"Those who wander aren't always lost"
 

Bekki

Savannah Super Cat
#7
There's no way to check at that age to see if the vaccine took I presume.


"Those who wander aren't always lost"
 

Patti

Admin
Staff member
#8
Vaccine series are recommended of kittens because of their immature immune system. When they are so young the vaccine will 'wear off' in 6-9 weeks (just like the antibodies received in mother's colostrum the first few days wears off after 6-9 weeks). A kitten's immune system is considered to be developed enough to mount a more long lasting resistance after 12 weeks of age. So depending on your situation (see below), either two or three vaccines are recommended between 6 and 12 weeks of age. A one year booster is always recommended, but then (for a pet household) every three years after that.

Vaccines is one of those topics that is frequently debated because there are so many differing opinions about it. Here are the most recent recommendations from the American Association of Feline Practitioners. You will notice that they give different guidelines depending if you are a pet owner, a breeder, or a shelter: http://jfm.sagepub.com/content/15/9/785.full.pdf+html
 

Bekki

Savannah Super Cat
#9
Thank you and I know there are so many opinions. I even read how people use noseodes instead of vaccine which I wouldn't fully trust by itself due to the lack of proof or much research thus far.


"Those who wander aren't always lost"