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Public Service Announcement -- Those Hellish Hair Balls

Kristin

Animal Communicator
Hey WW, I saw another article saying that what binds the biotin in the egg whites is actually negated in the yolk??? Not sure....I don't give raw eggs anyways since Zeddie won't eat them, but I've heard it both ways, so I'm a bit confused :confused: Maybe I can find where I saw it...
 

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
Hey WW, I saw another article saying that what binds the biotin in the egg whites is actually negated in the yolk??? Not sure....I don't give raw eggs anyways since Zeddie won't eat them, but I've heard it both ways, so I'm a bit confused :confused: Maybe I can find where I saw it...
Please post if you find it. Avidin is the antimicrobial protein in egg whites that prevents biotin absorption. Heat denatures avidin making it susceptible to digestion. In humans, consumption of raw egg whites would have to be either in great quantities in short duration or lesser quantities over a long period of time to induce biotin deficiency. I don't recall seeing anything that speaks to how much raw egg white must be consumed by a cat for the deficiency to occur. I think most of the cat/dog raw feeding sites recommend always cooking the whites absent any studies that show the amounts harmful to pets and to err on the safe side.
 

WitchyWoman

Admin
Staff member
Found this from 1977 study:
Biotin deficiency in the cat and the effect on hepatic propionyl CoA carboxylase.
Carey CJ, Morris JG.
Abstract
Biotin deficiency was produced in growing kittens by feeding a diet containing dried, raw egg white. After receiving either an 18.5% egg white diet for 25 weeks, or a 32% egg white diet for 12 weeks, they exhibited dermal lesions characterized by alopecia, scaly dermatitis and achromotrichia, which increased in severity with the deficiency. Females developed accumulations of dried salivary, nasal and lacrymal secretions in the facial region although a male did not. There was a loss of body weight in all cats as the deficiency progressed. Hepatic propionyl CoA carboxylase activities were measured on biopsy samples of liver during biotin deficiency and after biotin supplementation. In the deficient state, activities were 4% and 24% of that following biotin supplementation. Propionyl carboxylase activity in the liver of the cat was comparable to that reported in the rat and chick in the deficient and normal states. Subcutaneous injection of 0.25 mg biotin every other day while continuing to receive the egg white diet caused remission of clinical signs, a body weight gain and increased food intake.
 

MM3

Site Supporter
I was informed by my vets office to not give her eggs. Nice to know something else I can try. She turns her nose up to everything.
 

Kristin

Animal Communicator
I saw it on a raw feeding group months ago. I will see if I can find it. In the study, though, they were only feeding egg whites. In the article I read, it said that it has to be the egg white and yolk.
 
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