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Why Savannah Kittens Should Not Leave before 12-16 Weeks

#51
As most of you probably read, I got my girl a week ago...at the age of 8 weeks. Yes, I know that was entirely too early. It was not planned that way in the beginning, either. But, the "breeder" took them to the vet and decided they were ready to go...so I took her.

So far, so good. One of the main things I see being a "problem" is that she has tried to nurse on my male cat a couple times. And also on a really soft and furry blanket I have. Does anyone know of a way I can deter her from doing this?? :oops:
I kinda disagree with Paige on this one- kinda. The nursing off of the male, no issue- but if you can break her from nursing off of blankets, it is safer. Sometimes, cats/kittens can choose to nurse off of a fabric and they end up ingesting it and causing a blockage.

So... At least keep an eye on the blankies she is nursing off of. Wool is one of the worse materials for a cat to get a hold of and do this too- can't remember why, but I'm positive of it.
 

admin

Paige
Staff member
#52
I kinda disagree with Paige on this one- kinda. The nursing off of the male, no issue- but if you can break her from nursing off of blankets, it is safer. Sometimes, cats/kittens can choose to nurse off of a fabric and they end up ingesting it and causing a blockage.

So... At least keep an eye on the blankies she is nursing off of. Wool is one of the worse materials for a cat to get a hold of and do this too- can't remember why, but I'm positive of it.
No, I agree with you on that Trish and meant to amend my post...the blankie thing I would not encourage.
 

Pam Flachs

Savannah Super Cat
#53
I kinda disagree with Paige on this one- kinda. The nursing off of the male, no issue- but if you can break her from nursing off of blankets, it is safer. Sometimes, cats/kittens can choose to nurse off of a fabric and they end up ingesting it and causing a blockage.

So... At least keep an eye on the blankies she is nursing off of. Wool is one of the worse materials for a cat to get a hold of and do this too- can't remember why, but I'm positive of it.

I agree, too, Trish. I have two adult cats (F3C Savannah and DSH) who occasionally suck fleece blankets while kneading with their front paws...all the while purring and with a glazed look in their eye. That action is precipitated by being petted for a lengthy period...neither girl who does this appears to be ingesting the blanket, but we do keep an eye on it and try to discourage the behavior by diverting them with a toy.

There are lots of theories as to why cats and kittens do this...callled "Wool Sucking"...ranging from early weaning and removal from the mother, to lack of fiber in the diet, pica, stress, breed of cat, etc....but it can progress from kittenhood to become a life-long obsession and quite possibly a dangerous habit.

Ingesting wool (from sweaters, blankets, rugs, etc) can create an intestinal blockage, often life-threatening and requiring surgery. One theory is that the taste of lanolin in wool is appealing to cats.

I thought this site gave the most sensible explanation for Wool Sucking along with suggestions on how to curb it:

http://www.thecatsite.com/a/wool-sucking-cats
 

Arinelle

Savannah Super Cat
#54
The first two weeks in isolation from other animals is not only for disease control, but also to insure that the baby bonds with you; there will be time or the others later. That baby needs to realize that you are the "mommy" now, supplying the yummy nutrition and, even more important, comfort and reassurance when baby gets scared. You spend as much time as possible with that baby, sleeping together, hand feeding treats or little tiny bits of cooked chicken, carrying him around and howing him things, talking softly. That baby will soon delight in seeing you and trust the others through your trust in them. Check riverridgesavannahs on YouTube to see our dog and cat.
This is the exact thing my breeder said when I got Ayanai. As hard as it was to wait that extra time it was worth it. She bonded well with me, and when my parents came for a visit a few weeks later she took a liking to them right off the bat after seeing how I acting with them. She never warmed up to my roommate though (who irritated me to no end, but she is gone now), and I think she picked that up from me as well. I have had various friends and random people (pizza delivery) comment on how much she just sits there and watches them. She gets along very well with my puppy and my older dsh, and by far it has been the best introduction of a new animal that I have ever done.

Ayanai's ears don't seem quite so large now as they did when I got her, but she is only seven months old now and I may have gotten used to seeing those wonderful appendages. She has a lot of growing left to go and I can't wait to see how she develops. I need to start taking more pictures!
 
T

The Kasbah

Guest
#55
Any breeder releasing kittens at 7 or even 8 weeks old is being highly irresponsible in my opinion, and I would strongly caution anyone from buying from them! The absolute earliest is have taken delivery of a kitten is at 10 weeks old (2 separate instances) and they were handled with kid gloves when they arrived. The earliest mine leave is 12 weeks old, and if that is a deal breaker then so be it. The health and well being of our kittens is our first priority and a good pet owner will understand and respect that they need to be properly vaccinated, weaned, wormed and socially well adjusted before leaving.

Correct me if I'm mistaken, but you've received at least three 10-week old kittens over the years that I know about: Roxie, Tonka and Lindsay :) As you know, I release my kittens at 10-weeks. Always have, always will...unless they are not demonstrating consistent litter box habits, having difficulty weaning or suffering from vaccine reaction... In those instances I will hold a kitten for a few additional weeks to make sure everything is as it should be, but that has only happened a few times over the years. For the most part, they are ready to go at 10-weeks. 7-weeks? NEVER!
 
#56
Correct me if I'm mistaken, but you've received at least three 10-week old kittens over the years that I know about: Roxie, Tonka and Lindsay :) As you know, I release my kittens at 10-weeks. Always have, always will...unless they are not demonstrating consistent litter box habits, having difficulty weaning or suffering from vaccine reaction... In those instances I will hold a kitten for a few additional weeks to make sure everything is as it should be, but that has only happened a few times over the years. For the most part, they are ready to go at 10-weeks. 7-weeks? NEVER!
Correct Cynthia as I noted in my post you quoted - "The earliest I have ever taken delivery of a kitten was at 10 weeks."

Do I recommend 10 weeks or younger for pet kitten buyers? No, and I won't release pet kittens until at least 12 weeks for a couple of reasons. 1) First vaccines are given at 8 - 9 weeks. The only way I can send a kitten with 2 sets of vaccinations and follow protocol of 4 weeks between vaccinations is to wait until they are 12 - 13 weeks old. 2) I think those couple extra weeks allow the kittens to mature a bit and be better able to adapt to what amounts to a major life change for them.

I'm not condemning anyone, simply stating my opinion, and like you I am entitled to have one, even if it is slightly different than yours. :)
 
#57
Correct Cynthia as I noted in my post you quoted - "The earliest I have ever taken delivery of a kitten was at 10 weeks."

Do I recommend 10 weeks or younger for pet kitten buyers? No, and I won't release pet kittens until at least 12 weeks for a couple of reasons. 1) First vaccines are given at 8 - 9 weeks. The only way I can send a kitten with 2 sets of vaccinations and follow protocol of 4 weeks between vaccinations is to wait until they are 12 - 13 weeks old. 2) I think those couple extra weeks allow the kittens to mature a bit and be better able to adapt to what amounts to a major life change for them.

I'm not condemning anyone, simply stating my opinion, and like you I am entitled to have one, even if it is slightly different than yours. :)

And you are correct, I have received 3 kittens from you over the years and in fact one from someone else at 10 weeks. The difference for me is that these transactions took place between experienced breeders...
 

John Popp

Site Supporter
#58
Getting our first SV at 9 weeks of age and the second at 12 made a world of difference. Some of the social issues were remedied and certainly the digestive issues were greatly improved. Perhaps happenstance, but as a result I won't be bringing a kitten home in the future that hasn't reached 12 weeks of age.

Side note of interest, it really to took Chongo 3 months of interacting with a kitten to get some of social issues resolved. As much as our little boy Monte took away from interacting with Chongo, those lessons learned were far more beneficial to Chongo.
 
T

The Kasbah

Guest
#59
Getting our first SV at 9 weeks of age and the second at 12 made a world of difference. Some of the social issues were remedied and certainly the digestive issues were greatly improved. Perhaps happenstance, but as a result I won't be bringing a kitten home in the future that hasn't reached 12 weeks of age.

Side note of interest, it really to took Chongo 3 months of interacting with a kitten to get some of social issues resolved. As much as our little boy Monte took away from interacting with Chongo, those lessons learned were far more beneficial to Chongo.
John, kittens do not develop digestive issues because they are young. They can suffer terrible digestive upset if their diet is changed when they move to their forever homes or in other cases, because the kitten is infected with a parasite of some sort. A cat or kitten of ANY age can develop loose stools as the result of either of the aforementioned. It is not, however, something that can be attributed to age exclusively.

All best,
 

John Popp

Site Supporter
#60
There is a very delicate dance that happens between the mouth and the digestive tract when infant animals are developing their intestinal flora. Saliva kills some bacteria allowing other bacteria through to form the microflora in the intestines. Changing environment as well as food can interrupt proper flora being created, and basically change the roadmap.

Change of environment or food can change the make up of a very carefully crafted ecosystem of bacteria/intestinal flora, and just like different humans the footprint of intestinal flora isn't the same from one of us to another. Deviation of the incoming bacteria disrupts the ecosystem being created in the intestines, and that of course makes it more difficult for saliva which becomes the gatekeeper for bacteria to sort out what is a healthy digestive tract.